art, words & oddities
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RAMBLINGS

Don't Be Afraid To Get Creative With Your Resumé

 

Artists and creatives, don’t be afraid to think outside of the box when it comes to the crafting of your resume´. With so many candidate’s qualifications floating around out there, neatly typed onto 32 lb. ecru paper, sometimes you will need to take a chance to catch the eye of your future employer; and getting creative with your resume´ may be just the thing you need to do to stand out from the crowd.

Not all industries are going to appreciate a creative resume´ but I am betting that if you are seeking a job in the arts or entering into the fields of advertising, marketing or design, a non-traditional resume´ is just the ticket to get you noticed. That being said, it is important to make sure that your new interpretation can showcase your skills at a glance, and it is critical that you have the qualifications to back it up. 

When hand crafting a unique resume´ keep in mind the industry that you are entering and create something that speaks directly to that industry. Entering the design field? It may be as simple as having a unique layout or eye-catching typography. Want to work for an advertising firm? Create an "ad" that sells you as the brand and it may just get you the interview. Or, if you are looking for a job working for Tom Hanks, peck out your resume´ on a Vintage 1929 Underwood and mail him the whole damned typewriter! Whatever you do, make sure that your design layout and interpretation is good and certainly keep it professional

The key is to get you noticed. That is your initial goal, ultimately your future employer may then ask you for a more traditional layout, which you will always have waiting in the wings.

The inspiration for this resume´ came from the cover of The Annotated Mona Lisa: A Crash Course in Art History from Prehistoric to Post-Modern by Carol Strickland.

The inspiration for this resume´ came from the cover of The Annotated Mona Lisa: A Crash Course in Art History from Prehistoric to Post-Modern by Carol Strickland.